Viera’s Karmaker headed to International HOSA event


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Members of Viera High's HOSA club pose following the state competition held at the University of Central Florida last month. Pritom "Peter" Karmaker (center, with medal) placed second in the Dental Terminology category. Karmaker is the only Brevard County student who qualified for the international event.

VIERA VOICE Courtesy of Frances Johnston

 

It’s an academic event that Viera High School students had never competed in before this year.

And now Viera senior Pritom “Peter” Karmaker is Brevard County’s last person standing.

Karmaker placed second in the Dental Terminology division last month at the state level of the Future Health Professionals, formerly known as Health Occupations Students of America, (HOSA) competition.

That means he has qualified to take part in the 41st HOSA International Leadership Conference in Dallas June 27 to 30, where he will compete with students from around the country, and the world.

Karmaker is the only Brevard County student to qualify for the event.

Although there were a number of different categories to compete in, Karmaker said he chose Dental Terminology — which consisted of a 100-question, hand-written test with 20 tiebreaker questions — because of Viera teacher Frances Johnston, who also is the Viera HOSA Club’s advisor.

“Honestly, I felt pretty confident about the test because it was stuff that I’ve learned,” Karmaker said. “I’ve had Mrs. Johnston as my dental teacher. I had her for three years and during those three years, we’ve learned a lot of stuff about dentistry.

“That’s why I entered that event in the first place. I felt like I could do pretty well.”

This was the first year Viera’s HOSA Club team has competed. The school sent 14 students to the regional event and in a stunning debut, 14 of them placed.

That included Karmaker, who took first in his category.

Questions at the state-level competition ranged from pathophysiology to anatomy of the head and neck, procedures a dentist would perform and medial law.

“It’s definitely not the easiest test, but I would say there was a good 80, 85 percent of the questions, I definitely knew,” Karmaker said. “The other 15 (percent) or so, maybe I was a little bit iffy because I’d never seen them before and there was no practice test I was able to take.

“In all honesty, I could have studied a bit more beforehand … but I didn’t do that. If I did, maybe I could have gotten first. But I feel like it’s a good thing I got second because I’m going to take it more seriously when I go to the internationals.”

While he may be competing in dental terminology, Karmaker wants to become a cardiologist. He will attend the University of Central Florida in the fall.

“Peter is academically gifted,” Johnston wrote in an email. “He has always strived to be the best he could be. I also believe he will achieve his greatest dream of becoming a cardiologist in the future.

“I know, I would hire him as my cardiologist when my time comes to need a good one!”